More on that Banned Books Issue

March 23, 2006 @ 3:52 am | Filed under: Current Affairs

Remember that board of trustees that scratched a bunch of books from a to-purchase list drawn up by a team of parents and teachers?

Turns out the trustees hadn’t read the books they axed.

“When it came time to say which were acceptable and which ones weren’t, they picked a bloc of books that had Clifford and Disney, that they really had no problem with, but they were in the same group that they did have concerns about,” trustee Maurice Kunkel said.

Now that is something that really, really gets my goat: people who make judgments about books without having read them—that is, judgments that affect whether other people can or will read the books in question. Obviously, we all make private judgments every time we decide whether to read or not to read a particular book. But those who make public judgments, those affecting policy decisions or reader opinion, have a responsibility to make informed decisions.

Camille has more. So does Becky.

(I do still see a difference between not buying and banning. But this board of trustees had no business overriding parent/teacher choices without even troubling themselves to read the books in question.)


Tags: , , , ,


    Related Posts

  • Thirteen Cars
    Thirteen Cars
  • “Soybean fields or canola fields or sunflower fields, they all have this systemic insecticide.”
    “Soybean fields or canola fields or sunflower fields, they all have this systemic insecticide.”
  • California Schools Superintendent Tells Homeschoolers Not to Worry
    California Schools Superintendent Tells Homeschoolers Not to Worry
  • CPSIA and the Illegal Books Meme
    CPSIA and the Illegal Books Meme
  • What Is Network Neutrality and Why Should I Care?
    What Is Network Neutrality and Why Should I Care?

Comments

3 Responses | | Comments Feed

  1. Please spread the word…


    In Him,
    Amy

  2. Gets my goat too, especially when people(who have never read it) want to ban the Bible.

  3. Thanks for the update! And I’ll also add that not every removal from a library is banning. It’s entirely possible that a book more appropriate to a high school somehow ends up on an elementary school shelf. That being brought to the attention of a librarian, and fixed, is not banning.