Three Ways to Get More Poetry into Your Day

March 16, 2005 @ 1:37 pm | Filed under: Poetry

If you read this blog regularly, you probably know I’ve got a passion for poetry. Actually, I talk about it a lot less here than I could if I gave myself free rein. Maybe when I finish up this (overdue) novel I’m working on, I’ll loosen the reins for a while…we’ll see.

But for now, I’ll keep it brief. Three suggestions:

• Get a copy of Favorite Poems Old and New, edited by Helen Ferris. This excellent anthology is arranged thematically, so it’s easy to find a perfect poem to fit your day. There’s a happy mix of serious classics and whimsical children’s verse. My pal Sarah just scored a copy at our local library sale for $1.50—lucky woman! I keep our copy beside the kitchen table for our breakfast poetry readings.

• Look for books in the Poetry for Young People series. I mentioned the Emily Dickinson edition the other day. We have several of these lovely books, because Scott gives the kids one book for every holiday. This series has been a consistent hit. The William Butler Yeats edition is breathtaking. The volumes are picture-book-sized, with lovely art and brief, helpful glosses on the poems.

• Sign up to receive PoemHunter’s “Poem of the Day.” This free email service sends a poem to your mailbox every morning. In the past week I’ve enjoyed poems by James Whitcomb Riley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, my beloved Robert Burns, and—what lovely timing (see previous post)—Henry David Thoreau.


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Comments

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  1. Melissa, please add my favorite poetry round-up to your list:

    Read-Aloud Poems for Young People (edited by Glorya Hale).

    It’s got such a wonderful collection of classics grouped by theme. it’s beautifually laid out and covers a wide range of well-known (and loved!) poets.

    We love the Poetry for Young People series. My personal favorite is the Rudyard Kipling edition. 🙂 But I’m partial to Kipling already (love the Just So Stories and even his novels for adults).

    Great list. Will sign up for PoemHunters. That’s new to me.