Rohan Maitzen on academic blogging

January 22, 2015 @ 8:43 am | Filed under:

“What I really tried to emphasize in my own remarks is that if we think about why we do research and publish it in the first place–to advance or improve a conversation–then writing online makes perfect sense. I also stressed that for me, the real benefits are intellectual. I specifically invited follow-up questions about ways my blogging had affected my teaching, my research, my writing, and/or my intellectual life. I didn’t get any questions about that at all, leading me to think that the single most important quotation in the presentation is the one from Jo VanEvery: ‘Scholars lose sight of the fact that academic publishing is about communication. Or, perhaps more accurately, communication appears disconnected from the validation process.’ What people wanted to talk about was “validation.” As I said at the close of the discussion, I think that preoccupation in itself is worth reflecting on. It’s inevitable, perhaps, because we are professionals trying to get and keep jobs and build careers, but I think concern about bureaucratic processes should follow on reaching a better understanding of the value of the activity, to the individual scholar, to the university, and to the broader community.”

via What We Talk About When We Talk About Academic Blogging » Novel Readings – Notes on Literature and Criticism.


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    Elizabeth H. says:

    Interesting. In my previous life in academic publishing, we’d sometimes suggest to authors that they publish their work not in book form but as a series of journal articles — for the sake of “dissemination maximisation”. They were usually unimpressed.