Things We Read Today, and Other Happinesses

October 9, 2012 @ 6:19 pm | Filed under: Assorted and Sundry, Books, The Prairie Thief

Choo-Choo by Virginia Lee Burton. (She’s one of Huck’s favorite author/illustrators, going by how often he requests her books.)

Freight Train by Donald Crews. (You may detect a theme.)

Little Witch by Anna Elizabeth Bennett. (Chapter 1, to Rilla. I remember riding my bike to three different library branches in search of this book—not all on the same day—because I’d read it and loved it so, and couldn’t remember the author’s name later, only that it began with B. Today it would take my mom ten seconds on the library website to locate a copy. Back then it meant a bona fide, muscle-burning quest, and all in vain. I couldn’t find it. Years later, when I took a job at HarperCollins, I discovered that it was a Harper book, still in print. And yet somehow I didn’t reread it. This go-round with Rilla will be my first time in decades. I’m eager to see if it holds up to the glowing memories I have of that first reading so long ago. Minikin, nicknamed Minx! I got goosebumps. It’s out of print again, I see: pity.)

Speaking of Little Witches, it’s time to put another round of Dorrie books on hold at the library. One, two, three, ten…there, I’m done, no bicycle required.

Karen Edmisten made my day with a delightful account of a Prairie Thief luncheon held by her daughter’s book club. Potato chowder, dried berry scones, a bucket of hazelnuts (brilliant!), and brownies, of course. They even brewed some horseradish tea, which demonstrates an impressive degree of commitment. Thanks, Karen, for that wonderful post.

This morning we discovered that the passionflower vine I planted ages ago had snaked its way halfway across the butterfly garden. We untangled the wandering tendrils and tied them up along the back fence. I have every suspicion that it is out there right now, busily untying itself, and I’ll find it embracing the hibiscus bush tomorrow.


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Comments

4 Responses | | Comments Feed

  1. I have to go check out Little Witch from the library and see if it’s the same witch book that I loved when I was a child. It looks familiar, but I think I remember a book called “Which Witch”?

  2. At the risk of getting caught in the spam blocker ;-) I will ask if you know Halloweena? We simply love this picture book about a witch given a human baby to raise. Also, Nattie Witch, about a little witch girl and her ordinary day at home and school. I am guessing I may have mentioned these before, of course! Well, we’ve loved them for years, so glad we were able to get copies when they were still in print.

  3. Which Witch is by Eva Ibbotson, a lovely story.

    Do you know the Worst Witch books by Jill Murphy? (she’s also done a slew of picture books) They’re a LOT of fun, I adored those as a 7orso year old, slightly hopeless Mildred Hubble at a magic boarding school (years before HP!) staggering from one scrape to another. Fantastic!

    newish picture books we’ve enjoyed The Witch’s Children by Ursula Jones & Russel Ayto,
    The Everyday Witch by Liz Marinez & Mark Beech,
    and The Haunted House by Kazuno Kahara, which is all orange, black & white and a lovely story of a little girl witch and her cat who move in to a haunted house and deal with all the ghosts there – really sweet and lovely, if you can imagine that!

  4. Ellie: no, I haven’t read Halloweena! Nor Nattie Witch—thanks for both suggestions.
    Mamacrow, I don’t think I know the Worst Witch books either! I’m underwitched here, it seems! I haven’t even read Which Witch myself, though my three oldest girls adored it.

    Other witchy books I remember loving are the Ruth Chew ones—anyone remember those?